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Windows 10 Updates


Twin Wolf Technology Group

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I am seeing more and more clients with issues due to the latest Windows 10 Update.    Common issues are that printers/scanners and other devices that worked one day suddenly do not work the next day.   I also have had clients reporting their laptop will suddenly shuts down and not power back up until the laptop is plugged into the wall.   It gives every appearance that the battery is somehow bad.  It is not a bad battery at all.   The removal of the latest Microsoft update returns the laptop to normal working condition and the battery works as expected.

What to do...
Microsoft made a change in their policy back in June of this year.   Windows 10 users can no long block or defer any Microsoft updates.   They have taken away control of the operating system from you, the user/owner, and they dictate how your computer will operate and which updates it will receive, regardless of how it might effect you or your particular computer.

This is a change that most people are unaware of yet most will experience these some of these issues without warning.   Keep the phone number of your computer guy/gal close at hand.   If the issues suddenly appears one day when everything worked fine the day before, it very well might be a Microsoft update.    

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Yes small buggie things are happening. I had to reinstall my printer 2 times. It has held up now for some reason. Sticky Notes went absolutely nuts so I wrote down the old notes on paper, delete the old ones, rewrote new notes and it works fine. Don't have a clue what repaired sticky notes. I expected some issues but these small ones aren't too bad. No Major problems yet. I have noticed a little unstable behavior but not much. Then it goes away pretty quick. The Cortana is a real pain in the ass. You have to go into DOS to disable it and that's scary for the common user. No way to just turn it off.

Edited by Hil
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The last laptop I bought is a Dell and it came with Windows 10 installed.  I havent had any major problem with this new Windows.   

Recently I found that it is giving me trouble with video projectors when doing presentations.  I did not recognized the video projectors.  This new computer came with only a HDMI video port and not more the regular VGA Video port.  

I will look what is the best solution for this issue.  I give a lot of presentations to my customers and this is a problem for me.

 

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I'm having trouble with Win 7 updates.  The latest ones wouldn't download.  It just kept running and staying at 0.  Some googling revealed this is a common problem with 7, especially since 10 came out.  Is anyone else experiencing this?

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Judy, this has been a problem with many versions of Windows, not just Windows 7.   It is not related to the release of Windows 10, however Microsoft continues to change their policies and update process.   Fixing this issue often requires several steps to clean out and reset the update process.   From a security standpoint, it is important that the updates get applied and the operating system is up-to-date at all times.

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11 hours ago, Twin Wolf Technology Group said:

Roger,

To solve your issue, you need to get an HDMI to VGA converter.   Amazon has them very inexpensive.   Here is one I would recommend:

https://www.amazon.com/VicTsing-Gold-Plated-Converter-Adapter-Desktop/dp/B016HL4CAY/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1477665023&sr=8-3&keywords=hdmi+to+vga+adapter

You plug this into the HDMI port on your laptop and then use a VGA cable to run between the projector and the computer.

Twin Wolf

Thanks for the information.

Since some companies use TV Sets as monitors in their conference rooms looks like the trend goes to using HDMI ports.   But I went to bed with this worry in my mind so I waked up early this morning and did a update on all the drivers, specially those that have to do with graphic boards and monitors.   I dont know how but I went today to a customer office to do a presentation and without hope I connected my laptop to their video projector........ suddenly the image of my desktop appeared on the screen.  I felt so happy like a kid wearing new shoes.  Looks like in some way it did solved the problem.

But believe me.  I appreciate your advice and I was seriously considering that option.

 

Roger

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I retired from a college with "smart class rooms". We had to go with HDMI 5 years ago. Panama is a little behind on the products using HDMI technology.  HDMI provides better color and sound for projectors and other devices. The VGA To HDMI works well here in Boquete. A friend of mine used it for a little while. When they bought the new projector it did not have the VGA so no choice but go with HDMI cable. In the end, it's best to upgrade projectors or buy one that has WiFi capabilities and hope for WiFi at all locations (both options are the best). I had one projector on the college campus that cost $25,000.  It was a Sony. It stored presentations (microsoft products such as spread sheets) was WiFi capable and could be manipulate from off campus. It would send me an email if the projector was left on after a certian hour and I could turn it off with my cell phone. Good luck.

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18 hours ago, Twin Wolf Technology Group said:

Judy, this has been a problem with many versions of Windows, not just Windows 7.   It is not related to the release of Windows 10, however Microsoft continues to change their policies and update process.   Fixing this issue often requires several steps to clean out and reset the update process.   From a security standpoint, it is important that the updates get applied and the operating system is up-to-date at all times.

The last time Microsoft "fixed" the updating problem on my old XP computer, they nearly destroyed the computer.  It took a tech visit to get it going again, and it never worked right after that.  I will not ask for their help again.  I'll wait for them to fix their problems.

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It's probably been about a year now since I pushed the 'Upgrade to Windows 10' button.

Despite dire warnings from those with a fear of the unknown, I've had no issues whatsoever.

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1 hour ago, Keith Woolford said:

It's probably been about a year now since I pushed the 'Upgrade to Windows 10' button.

Despite dire warnings from those with a fear of the unknown, I've had no issues whatsoever.

Keith

 

Looks like most of the problems found on Windows 10 are when you upgrade from a previous version of Windows.  It happened to me with the last laptop I had.  I did the upgrade and I have had some problems.  I bought a new one that came with the Windows 10 installed and the problems have been minors.  Only a couple of issues like the one with the Video Projectors and other one that downloading drivers and updates solved the problems. 

The old laptop I did uninstall all the software I had there and did a restore of the system and it is working fine again.   I guess that the new upgrade to Windows 10 had some conflicts with the software already installed.

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I am running Windows 10 on three computers and a tablet 2-in-1 with no problems or driver/peripheral issues,

Do agree with Dan that it's a bit eerie at night when "somebody at Microsoft" decides without my input to start sending down updates. Even Apple's highly protected "walled garden" iOS asks my permission if they want to enter.

Still, in this day & age of ubiquity and connectivity it's a no-win situation: be up-to-date or be out-of-date.

Can't seem to be just a bit pregnant.

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In other news, Oct 31st is the last day that Microsoft will allows OEMs (Original Equipment Manufactures) to build computers with Windows 7 pre-installed.   While you will still be able to buy computers with Windows 7 pre-installed for a short time, once the supply in the stores and warehouses is gone, your choice for Microsoft will only be Windows 10.

Like every operating system, there are its devotees and its critics.   User experiences vary greatly.   Combining that with the fact that both Apple and Microsoft are changing as technology evolves, and you have a situation where the average person is easily confused.

Realize that what you have and use today is not what you will have and use in the future.   My advice is to keep your knowledge up to date while staying one step back from the leading edge of change.   I will attempt to post important technology updates.  At the rate of change that can be a full time job!

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10 hours ago, Keith Woolford said:

It's probably been about a year now since I pushed the 'Upgrade to Windows 10' button.

Despite dire warnings from those with a fear of the unknown, I've had no issues whatsoever.

It's not fear of the unknown.  It's "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."  We have enough stress in our lives without having to cope with a new OS for no reason.

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On 10/28/2016 at 1:44 PM, Twin Wolf Technology Group said:

Judy, this has been a problem with many versions of Windows, not just Windows 7.   It is not related to the release of Windows 10, however Microsoft continues to change their policies and update process.   Fixing this issue often requires several steps to clean out and reset the update process.   From a security standpoint, it is important that the updates get applied and the operating system is up-to-date at all times.

I tried it again today, and it worked.  Perhaps MS corrected the problem.

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Background: I recently was able to take advantage of about 35 hours of professional training on Windows 10. These were separate one-hour sessions in a classroom environment using new computers running the latest version of Windows 10, which is called Windows 10 Anniversary Update. The classroom had 16 stations, but at most of the training sessions there were students at chairs looking over the shoulders of those fortunate enough to get a station. (Nice hardware, BTW.) The instructor, Kristin, was a Microsoft employee with about ten years tenure with Microsoft.

Two motivators for Microsoft to bring out a new operating system are (a) industry trends toward the use of touch technology (as opposed to man-machine interfaces based on a keyboard or mouse), and (b) the movement from programs to apps, or the incorporation of both. Apps are modern, dedicated applications running under what Kristin called a "metropolitan operating system concept". Please do not ask me to explain that term. A program and an app are different beasts.

The subject of Windows 10 crashing (actually the word 'trashing' was used many times) the computers that were being upgraded from prior versions of the Windows OS came up (many times). Kristin explained that almost all cases experiencing crashing/trashing were the result of hardware and/or software driver incompatibilities. Only Windows 7 and Windows 8 systems were candidates for an upgrade to Windows 10. In other words, Windows Vista and XP could not be upgraded, and more than likely would not have hardware compatible with Windows 10.

The biggie news here is that Windows 10 must have very new hardware in order to function properly. Video cards and drivers are a primary culprit. If you have a computer more than 2 or 3 years age, there likely will be hardware problems. Microsoft provides a free program (available on its website) to test and report compatibility of a machine prior to upgrading. It is my understanding that that program does not test peripheral compatibility.

Further on the 'driver' comment in the prior paragraphs: once a machine is upgraded, then there likely will be driver incompatibility issues that cause major heartburn. For example, after upgrading a machine that had a common consumer grade ink jet or laser printer attached, then even the drivers that interface between the computer and the printer need to be upgraded as well -- providing such a driver upgrade exists. Ouch.

Those who upgrade and do so successfully are indeed lucky people (my terminology, not Microsoft's terminology). My own experiences with upgrading were not something I choose to repeat. The best situation would be either (1) to use a fairly new machine that is known to be hardware compatible, and rather than upgrade to 'reimage' the system {that means to wipe it clean and basically create a new computer}, or (2) to buy a new machine with Windows 10 already installed.

To close on a positive note, I was really impressed with what Windows 10 can do. I found myself saying "Wow, I really like that" many times during these training sessions. My current think is to go into Windows 10 in 2017 based on new hardware.

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For the curious, let me explain the difference between an "app", an "application", a "program" and "software".   Most people use the terms interchangeably because the difference is either unknown or unimportant.

Software vs hardware is a simple concept.   Hardware is the physical components that make up your computer, tablet or phone.   Software is the set of instructions that make the hardware perform different tasks.   Looking at the four terms, they become increasingly more specific.   In other words, you can have many programs that make up a suite of software - such as Word, Excel, and Power Point programs all make up the Microsoft Office software suite.   The term software includes all programs, applications and apps.

Stepping down, an application is a program with a specific purpose yet contains multiple functions to accomplish a range of tasks.   For example your Word program is an application with a specific task of being a word processor.   It has the functions of creating text documents, spell checking them, sending them to the printer etc.

The confusion comes in when people think an "app" is an "application".   It is not.   An app is specific to a single function.   Because it is specific to a single function, it is not critical to the overall goal of an application or program.   Think of an app as similar to an icon.   You can delete an icon and still run the program/application from another point because you have not deleted the actual program/application.    Generally, apps are touch based.   They may be used to start an application but an app is not the application itself. 

Windows 10 has apps - a touch based way to start an application which may be part of a set of programs within a suite of software.

 

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