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Wind Turbine Electricity Generation Farms - Interesting Stats About the Penonomé Site


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Here is an interesting article about the generation of electricity at the Penonomé wind turbine electricity generation farm: http://www.centralamericadata.com/en/article/home/Panama_Wind_Power_Blows_Strong. According to that article, that wind turbine generation farm produced 21.7% of the national requirement. That number seems unrealistic to me, but what do I know?

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People

I try to keep my promises.   

Here is the distribution of the power generation in Panama by system at December 2015.

Hydro is still the highest with 55.96%.  Power generated by fosil fuels is the second with 34.13%.  Eolic generated power is very low at only 8.8%.  Solar generated power has a very little percentage of only 1.76%.

 

Sector Electrico - Panama.jpg

 

 

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Renewables always promise big and woefully underperform, to the extent that conventional power stations need to be available for backup when they fail.  In Ontario, Canada, the government has "invested" heavily in renewables and still they only produce a fraction of power needed, usually at times when it is not needed.  In the US., look at Solyndra or Ivanpaugh, both heavily subsidised by government and both huge money losers.  In Europe, most governments are backing away from renewables, realising that the only way they work is with the input of billions of tax dollars.  Is there a future for renewables?  Likely, yes, but on a more community or individual house basis.  I ran a home off grid for 5 years in Ontario quite successfully, but the time and effort needed would dissuade 99% of the population.  Thats why they call crazies like me the 1%!  

Until reliable battery systems come along, IMHO renewables are just dreams..Harsh, but true from someone who has done it.  One last comment - did I save money being off grid?  Well, if you dont count the cost of the equipment, my time and mechanical abilities then maybe, yes.  If you do count those things, then it was an exercise in losing money.

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Great post, JohnF13. Thanks.

Isn't it rewarding (in a perverse sort of way) to be one of the 1%ers? Makes for an interesting life.

I know a couple of people here in the Boquete area who live off-grid. One is by choice and the other is because there is no grid. I know it takes a lot of attention and nursing to keep things going.

As I was typing this, Keith posted a reply. He stole part of my thunder (but that is okay, Keith). I was going to say that the most promising advances in battery storage of energy that I have read about over the past year+ is based on R&D work done by Elon Musk's companies. I believe it is being done in their California and Nevada facilities. I recall rather significant advances in the storage capacities in their batteries.I also hear that battery life spans going up dramatically, assuming proper maintenance.

I likewise have some (admittedly minor) experience with being semi-off-grid. The electricity supply where we live is, well, let me say, not very dependable. Because of our security systems, communications systems, and computer systems, all of those components are effectively off-grid. I have a large investment in deep cycle batteries, gel technology (but I am also looking now at AGMs when replacements are necessary), inverters, and control mechanisms. The only thing missing is that the power source still is the grid. All of the electricity for those sensitive and critical systems is from the inverters, with switching from grid to batteries done with solid state circuitry rather than transfer switches. It has been a huge learning curve as to how to nurse those systems, but it is really reassuring that the electronics are totally protected from the power grid. Prior to transition, I was spending a huge amount of money either repairing, and more likely replacing computers, phones, DVRs and NVRs, etc. Would I do it again, probably, but in a different configuration than what I originally decided on.

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  • 2 months later...
On April 9, 2016 at 2:49 AM, Bud said:

Here is an interesting article about the generation of electricity at the Penonomé wind turbine electricity generation farm: http://www.centralamericadata.com/en/article/home/Panama_Wind_Power_Blows_Strong. According to that article, that wind turbine generation farm produced 21.7% of the national requirement. That number seems unrealistic to me, but what do I know?

I have highlighted the relevant words above and below that I now refer to. Note that I questioned the 21.7% energy production by wind turbines. The below article provides different numbers that seem more realistic to my way of thinking.

Hmm, 21.7% versus 7%. A bit more difference than rounding error.

I am not quoting the entire article because it is boring at best. However, the link to the full article is provided for those with such interest.

Quote

Panama: Electricity Market Figures in May 2016

In May, the national installed capacity amounted to 3,012 MW, made up of 26% hydro power using reservoir technology, 31% run of the river hydro, 34% thermal, 7% wind, and the rest is photovoltaic.

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

http://www.centralamericadata.com/en/article/main/Panama_Electricity_Market_Figures_in_May_2016

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Bud, I see it says 7% wind "installed capacity".  Wind turbines are notoriously inefficient, only producing a fraction of their rated capacity.  So looking at the above figures, that means, I think, that there is about 210MW of installed wind turbines.  Likely, if other sites around the World are any indication, the actual production will be a fraction of that.  Wind and solar are great, but in small, directed installations such as a house or small community.  For a major power grid they are an extremely poor return on investment. 

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  • 3 weeks later...
Quote

Panama: More Wind Power Generation

In the first five months of the year wind generated electricity exceeded 600 million Kwh, almost three times more than in the same period in 2015.

Thursday, July 21, 2016

The national supply of electricity generated by wind power grew by 259% in the period January-May 2016 compared to the same period in 2015, according to figures from the Office of the Comptroller General of Colombia.

See also: "Panama: Electricity Market Figures in May 2016"

Electricity generation using solar power rose from 502,000 kwh in the first five months of 2015 to more than 19 million in the same period this year. 

Thermal plants increased their generation by 25%, while electricity from hydraulic sources decreased by 15% compared to the same period in 2015, the result of drought during this period.

See electricity generation statistics complied by the Comptroller General. (In Spanish)

http://www.centralamericadata.com/en/article/main/Panama_More_Wind_Power_Generation

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Panama: More Wind Power Generation

By Tom on July 26, 2016 in News from Panama
Post Views: 107

wind energy

In the first five months of the year wind generated electricity exceeded 600 million Kwh, almost three times more than in the same period in 2015.

The national supply of electricity generated by wind power grew by 259% in the period January-May 2016 compared to the same period in 2015, according to figures from the Office of the Comptroller General of Colombia.

See also: “Panama: Electricity Market Figures in May 2016

Electricity generation using solar power rose from 502,000 kwh in the first five months of 2015 to more than 19 million in the same period this year. 

Thermal plants increased their generation by 25%, while electricity from hydraulic sources decreased by 15% compared to the same period in 2015, the result of drought during this period.

http://panamaadvisoryinternationalgroup.com/blog/news-from-panama/panama-more-wind-power-generation/

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  • 4 weeks later...
Quote

Panama: More Incentives for Solar Energy

Companies that build or operate solar plants will enjoy exemptions from import duties, tariffs, taxes and various levies.

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

From a decree by the National Assembly published in the Official Newspaper of Panama:

Article 1. Clause 1 of Article 20 of Law 37 of 2013 reads as follows :   

Article 20. Natural or legal persons who build, operate or maintain plants and / or solar installations will enjoy the following incentives:  

1.  Exemption from import taxes, tariffs, duties, levies and charges, as well as transfer tax on movable goods and provision of services, that may arise by reason of imports and / or purchases in the domestic market of equipment, machines, materials, spare parts and other goods necessary for the construction, operation and maintenance of the plants and / or solar installations.  

This provision also applies to the electricity stations and / or solar installations at the time of the entry into force of this Act, which are under construction, which will have a term of six months from the effective date to request recognition from the Ministry of Economy and Finance for the exemption. 

Read full decree (in spanish).

http://www.centralamericadata.com/en/article/main/Panama_More_Incentives_for_Solar_Energy

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Quote

Panama: More Incentives for Solar Energy

Companies that build or operate solar plants will enjoy exemptions from import duties, tariffs, taxes and various levies.

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

From a decree by the National Assembly published in the Official Newspaper of Panama:

Article 1. Clause 1 of Article 20 of Law 37 of 2013 reads as follows :   

Article 20. Natural or legal persons who build, operate or maintain plants and / or solar installations will enjoy the following incentives:  

1.  Exemption from import taxes, tariffs, duties, levies and charges, as well as transfer tax on movable goods and provision of services, that may arise by reason of imports and / or purchases in the domestic market of equipment, machines, materials, spare parts and other goods necessary for the construction, operation and maintenance of the plants and / or solar installations.  

This provision also applies to the electricity stations and / or solar installations at the time of the entry into force of this Act, which are under construction, which will have a term of six months from the effective date to request recognition from the Ministry of Economy and Finance for the exemption. 

Read full decree (in spanish).

http://www.centralamericadata.com/en/article/home/Panama_More_Incentives_for_Solar_Energy

Here is the official government Gaceta (gazette) article (in Spanish) [note: this is a large file at 22.3BM]:

GacetaNo_28093a_20160810.pdf

 

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