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Beef (Bovine) Meat As A Market Sector: Importation / Exportation, Health Issues, Market Demand, Protectionism, Regulations


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Beef: Export Alternatives to the U.S.

Because Panama lacks the certifications required by the U.S. country, authorities of that country are analyzing the possibility of exporting through certification in a laboratory in Honduras.

Monday, February 17, 2020

According to the authorities of the Ministry of Agricultural Development (MIDA), the U.S. authorities agree that Panama should certify the quality of the meat through analysis by Honduran laboratories.

You may be interested in "Beef Meat: Regional Sales up to March 2019"

Press.com reviews that "... The logistic terms for the shipment and reception of the samples, which would be assumed by the exporters, are about to be defined. Augusto Valderrama, Minister of Agricultural Development, reported that U.S. authorities authorized a reference laboratory in Honduras to perform the required analyses for meat exports to that country."

Valderrama added that "... it will not be long before MIDA laboratories finally have the equipment and reagents needed to meet U.S. requirements." In the meantime, they will have to certify the quality of the product abroad."

The United States has blocked the entry of Panamanian beef for more than 37 years because of the lack of guarantees for its phytosanitary standards.

https://www.centralamericadata.com/en/article/main/Beef_Export_Alternatives_to_the_US

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Cattle Herd Falls 4% in 2019

At the end of last year, the number of cattle in Panama reached 1.49 million, 3.8% less than in 2018.

Thursday, March 12, 2020

The General Comptroller of the Republic reported that between 2018 and 2019 the number of cattle decreased by 59,700, from 1,556,900 to 1,497,200, a decrease that is largely explained by the fall recorded in the province of Veraguas.

The report states that in the province of Veraguas the herd fell by 8%, from 252,400 to 232,100. In the case of Los Santos the decrease was 4%, in Cocle the variation was -3% and in Panama the decrease amounted to 7%.

Colon was the province that registered the largest increase in its herd, going from 67,800 to 74,800, which is equivalent to a variation of 10%. Herrera was another region that reported a positive variation, in this case it was 2%.

 

https://www.centralamericadata.com/en/article/main/Cattle_Herd_Falls_4_in_2019

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Cattle Slaughter Increases 3%

Between the first two months of 2019 and the same period in 2020, the number of pigs slaughtered in Panama increased by only 1%, while cattle slaughtering grew by 3%.

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

The General Comptroller's Office of the Republic of Panama reported that 80,841 heads of pigs were slaughtered in the first two months of the year, a figure higher than the 80,067 reported in the same period of 2019.

You may be interested in "Beef: Regional Market Up 4%"

The report explains that in the case of cattle, the number of heads slaughtered for the periods in question increased by 3% from 55,352 to 56,883. Statistics show that the number of cattle classified by male reported a 3% decrease.

In the case of cattle classified as female, the increase was 9%, from 26,037 to 28,334.

See full report (in Spanish).

 

https://www.centralamericadata.com/en/article/main/Cattle_Slaughter_Increases_3

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Meat: Forecast for the Panamanian Market

When the country's authorities begin to lift the restrictions that have been taken to prevent the spread of covid-19, it is predicted that in the meat sector, sales of chicken could contract by 2%.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Through a demand/income sensitivity model developed by the Trade Intelligence Unit of CentralAmericaData, variations in household demand for different goods and services can be projected as the most critical phases of the spread of covid-19 are overcome and the measures restricting mobility in the countries of the region are lifted.

For this analysis, it is assumed that quarantine and mobility restriction measures will be extended for three months.

In analyzing beef and veal sales projections, the interactive information system indicates that demand for beef steaks could be reduced by 4%. In the case of Milanese beef, the drop in sales could be more than 2%.

Compared to sales levels prior to the Covid-19 crisis, sales of Rib and Pork Chop could drop by 1% and marketing of Pork Leg Piece would also fall by approximately 1%.

The "Information System: Covid-19 and Business Outlook", is helping our clients to understand the new commercial reality of the demand for goods and services of companies in all sectors, with details such as the financial strength of customers and suppliers of each economic activity, allowing us to forecast which of them could face more difficulties in the coming months.

Click here to request access to this report.

 

https://www.centralamericadata.com/en/article/main/Meat_Forecast_for_the_Panamanian_Market

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Pandemic exposes Big Meat vulnerability

meat.jpg

Posted 13/05/2020

The coronavirus pandemic has forced meat-processing plants to close exposing the vulnerability of Big Meat” reports the Earth Day Network.

 The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a report last week, citing nearly 5,000 cases of COVID-19 and at least 20 deaths in meat-processing facilities across the country.

Both beef and pork production are down 35% from a year ago at this time, according to the United States Department of Agriculture, causing nationwide shortages: Grocery stores are now capping meat purchases, and fast-food joints are running out of hamburgers.

Because of their close quarters, meat-processing facilities are extremely susceptible to outbreaks. The CDC report cited the “difficulties with workplace physical distancing and hygiene and crowded living and transportation conditions” in plants as reasons for these cases.

Last month, that difficulty played out at a large scale when the New York Times reported on the country’s largest hot spot at the time: A South Dakota meat-processing plant, responsible for 44 percent of the state’s COVID-19 cases.

The U.S. government deemed the meat industry an essential business and thus ordered plants to remain open during the pandemic. But that order can’t prevent plants from closing due to health and safety concerns. And because of the nature of Big Meat in the U.S., these closures are sending ripples through the country, particularly damaging the supply chain.

“The food supply chain is vulnerable,” wrote John Tyson, CEO of Tyson Foods, last month. “As pork, beef and chicken plants are being forced to close, even for short periods of time, millions of pounds of meat will disappear from the supply chain.”

Tyson Foods exemplifies one of the biggest problems of the meat industry in a pandemic: its industrial scale. Tyson is the country’s largest meat company. One of the facilities it shuttered recently processes 5% of all the pork in the country. In fact, just 15 plants process nearly 60% of all pork in the U.S.

So, in other words, when one plant goes down, it affects a whole bunch of people.

“Breakdowns in the food supply chain could have significant economic impacts for both consumers and agricultural producers,” U.S. senators wrote in a letter last month to Vice President Mike Pence. “It is also imperative that precautions are taken to ensure the stability and safety of our food supply.”

New normal
The CDC cited several solutions in meat-processing plants, which have had varying success: adjusting start and stop times of shifts and breaks; adding outdoor break areas; installing physical barriers between workers; screening workers for temperature and symptoms.

But because of the systematic and structural nature of meat processing, less meat may be the new normal, at least for now.

 

https://www.newsroompanama.com/health/pandemic-exposes-big-meat-vulnerability

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Panama sees potential to boost exports to China in 2021: official

Xinhua, March 6, 2021

PANAMA CITY, March 5 (Xinhua) -- Panama has much potential to boost exports to China, its main trade partner, this year, as the country has signed several sanitary protocols with China.

More exports are expected to stage an economic rebound for the country against the backdrop of COVID-19, according to Eric Dormoi, national director of export promotion at the Ministry of Commerce and Industries.

Last year, Panama's exports amounted to 1.725 billion U.S. dollars, up 14.7 percent year on year, Dormoi told Xinhua by telephone.

The figure reflects the important role that copper concentrate has played in raising the country's exports, since it represented a whopping 62 percent of the total.

Foodstuffs represented 22 percent of the country's exports last year, Dormoi said, adding China was Panama's main export destination, which contributed 21 percent of the total.

Exports have undergone a relevant qualitative change from shipments of animal offal to specific cuts of frozen, boneless meat destined for China, Japan and the Caribbean, Dormoi noted.

After signing several sanitary protocols with China, Panama is waiting to get China's customs code and approval for the country's plants that produce pork, poultry and marine products, Dormoi said.

"Asian countries seem to recover more quickly from (medical) contingencies such as the pandemic than other regions. So the outlook is good for those markets," he said.

 

http://www.china.org.cn/world/Off_the_Wire/2021-03/06/content_77278875.htm

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Panama sees potential to boost exports to China in 2021: official

Source: Xinhua| 2021-03-06 23:56:21|Editor: huaxia139790062_16150461815131n.jpg
A staff member works at a plant of beef exporter and meatpacker Carnes de Cocle in Las Tablas of Los Santos, Panama, June 22, 2019. (Xinhua)

More exports are expected to stage an economic rebound for the country against the backdrop of COVID-19, according to Eric Dormoi, national director of export promotion at the Ministry of Commerce and Industries.

PANAMA CITY, March 5 (Xinhua) -- Panama has much potential to boost exports to China, its main trade partner, this year, as the country has signed several sanitary protocols with China.

More exports are expected to stage an economic rebound for the country against the backdrop of COVID-19, according to Eric Dormoi, national director of export promotion at the Ministry of Commerce and Industries.

Last year, Panama's exports amounted to 1.725 billion U.S. dollars, up 14.7 percent year on year, Dormoi told Xinhua by telephone.

The figure reflects the important role that copper concentrate has played in raising the country's exports, since it represented a whopping 62 percent of the total.

Foodstuffs represented 22 percent of the country's exports last year, Dormoi said, adding China was Panama's main export destination, which contributed 21 percent of the total.

Exports have undergone a relevant qualitative change from shipments of animal offal to specific cuts of frozen, boneless meat destined for China, Japan and the Caribbean, Dormoi noted.

After signing several sanitary protocols with China, Panama is waiting to get China's customs code and approval for the country's plants that produce pork, poultry and marine products, Dormoi said.

"Asian countries seem to recover more quickly from (medical) contingencies such as the pandemic than other regions. So the outlook is good for those markets," he said.

 

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2021-03/06/c_139790062.htm

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Beef: Central American Sales Up 16%

From January to September 2020, the countries of the region exported $527 million for beef, 16% more than what was registered in the same period of 2019, a rise that is explained by the behavior of Honduran, Panamanian, Costa Rican and Nicaraguan sales.

Monday, April 19, 2021

Figures from the Trade Intelligence Unit of CentralAmericaData:

image.png

Nicaragua, Main Seller
In the first nine months of 2020, the region's leading exporter continued to be Nicaragua, with $398 million, followed by Costa Rica, with $84 million, Panama, with $24 million, Honduras, with $16 million and Guatemala, with $4 million. El Salvador did not record significant exports.

For the period in question, Honduran sales increased 111% year-on-year, Panamanian 58%, Costa Rican 27% and Nicaraguan 12%. In the case of Guatemalan exports, a 30% decline was reported.

Regional Sales Up
Between January and September 2019 and the same period in 2020, the value of fresh, refrigerated and frozen beef exports from Central America rose 16%, from $453 million to $527 million.

Regional sales to the U.S. increased 29%, from $180 million to $232 million, and exports to China rose from $37 million to $57 million, an increase of 55%.

Destination of Exports
In the first nine months of 2020, 44% of the value exported from Central America was destined for the U.S., 11% for China, 8% for Puerto Rico, 7% for Mexico and 4% for Taiwan.

Export Prices
Between November 2014 and September 2020, the average price per kilo of fresh, chilled and frozen beef exports from the region fell 21%, from $5.34 to $4.22.

 

https://www.centralamericadata.com/en/article/main/Beef_Central_American_Sales_Up_16

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